Style by Taylor Swift


Overview

๐ŸŒŸ”Style” by Taylor Swift is a standout track from her 2014 album “1989.” The song is a sleek, pop-driven anthem that captures the allure and complexities of a cyclical romantic relationship. With its infectious melody, crisp production, and Swift’s smooth vocals, “Style” encapsulates the timeless and magnetic pull between two people who can’t seem to let each other go, despite their ups and downs. The lyrics paint a vivid picture of fashion and aesthetics as metaphors for the enduring nature of the relationship. The song’s polished sound and sophisticated themes mark a significant evolution in Swift’s musical and lyrical style.


Literary Devices in This Song

DeviceExampleExplanation
Metaphor“You got that James Dean daydream look in your eye”Compares the subject’s look to the iconic image of James Dean, suggesting a classic and timeless appeal.
Symbolism“Red lip classic thing that you like”Represents a recurring, timeless fashion choice that symbolizes the relationship’s enduring quality.
Repetition“We never go out of style”Emphasizes the enduring and unchanging nature of their relationship.
Irony“I say, ‘I heard, oh, that you’ve been out and about with some other girl’”Highlights the contradiction between the speaker’s casual tone and underlying jealousy.
Hyperbole“It’s been a while since I have even heard from you”Exaggerates to stress the length of time apart, emphasizing the impact of the separation.

Poetic Devices in This Song

DeviceExampleExplanation
Rhyme“Midnight / I come and pick you up, no headlights”Creates a musical quality and enhances the song’s flow.
RhythmThe smooth, steady beat throughout the songKeeps the song engaging and matches its sleek, sophisticated theme.
Assonance“You got that long hair, slicked back, white t-shirt”Repetition of the ‘a’ sound adds to the song’s melodic quality.
Enjambment“I say I heard / Oh, that you’ve been out and about with some other girl”Continues the sentence without a pause, enhancing the song’s flow.
Imagery“You got that long hair, slicked back, white t-shirt”Conjures a vivid picture of the subject’s classic, timeless style.

Figurative Language and Imagery in This Song

DeviceExampleExplanation
Metaphor“You got that James Dean daydream look in your eye”Suggests a classic and timeless appeal.
Imagery“You got that long hair, slicked back, white t-shirt”Creates a vivid picture of the subject’s classic, timeless style.
Hyperbole“It’s been a while since I have even heard from you”Stresses the length of time apart, emphasizing the impact of the separation.
Personification“And when we go crashing down, we come back every time”Attributes human qualities to the relationship, emphasizing its resilience.
Symbolism“Red lip classic thing that you like”Represents a recurring, timeless fashion choice that symbolizes the relationship’s enduring quality.

Thematic Analysis

ThemeExplanation
TimelessnessExplores the enduring and unchanging nature of the relationship.
AttractionHighlights the magnetic pull and physical appeal between the partners.
Cyclical NatureReflects on the recurring patterns and cycles in the relationship.
ResilienceEmphasizes the ability to withstand challenges and return to each other.
AestheticsUses fashion and style as metaphors for the relationship’s qualities.

Literary, Poetic, and Figurative Devices FAQs

What metaphors are used in “Style” by Taylor Swift?

Metaphors like “You got that James Dean daydream look in your eye” suggest a classic and timeless appeal, comparing the subject to the iconic image of James Dean.

How does Taylor Swift use imagery in the song?

Imagery such as “You got that long hair, slicked back, white t-shirt” creates vivid pictures of the subject’s classic, timeless style, enhancing the song’s aesthetic and emotional depth.

What is the significance of the repetition “We never go out of style”?

The repetition emphasizes the enduring and unchanging nature of the relationship, reinforcing the theme of timelessness.

Why does the song use hyperbole?

Hyperbole, like “It’s been a while since I have even heard from you,” is used to stress the length of time apart, adding intensity to the emotional narrative.

Can you explain the use of symbolism in “Style”?

Symbolism, such as “Red lip classic thing that you like,” represents recurring, timeless fashion choices that symbolize the relationship’s enduring quality, capturing the essence of its lasting appeal.

Index